Using TRIZ for Problem Solving – Resources

In our first post on this topic, “Using Triz for Problem Solving – Introduction“, we provided a very basic introduction to TRIZ.  In the spirit of TRIZ, it is not our intent to rewrite or redefine the TRIZ process when excellent information is already available.  Our intent is to identify the few of the many excellent and exceptional resources that we have found.

What is TRIZ?

To learn more about TRIZ and it’s applications we suggest visiting the following web sites that present a tremendous amount of information on the development and application of TRIZ.

TRIZ Principles

40 Inventive Principles with Examples:

Examples for each of the 40 Inventive Principles can be found at the following link:  http://www.triz-journal.com/archives/1997/07/b/index.html

TRIZ Resources

The Contradiction matrix:

As you will have learned from reading the “What is TRIZ?” page from the link above, one of the tools of TRIZ is the Contradiction Matrix that consists of 40 elements.  The TRIZ Contradiction Matrix is available as an Excel Spreadsheet through the following link:

http://www.triz-journal.com/archives/1997/07/matrix.xls

The TRIZ Journal ARTICLES:

The Triz Journal presents many informative articles.  One very intriguing article, “TRIZ / Systematic Innovation Enhances Hoshin Kanri“, by Darrell Mann and Ellen Domb, demonstrates the principles of TRIZ in a unique application.

An excellent article, “Create a High Performance Culture with Hoshin Kanri”, by Frank Deno can be found at the following link http://www.realinnovation.com/content/c080623a.asp

WEB Sites:

TRIZ Books:

A number of books are available on the topic of TRIZ.  Click here to preview the selections currently available.

TRIZ Challenges:

TRIZ is not without its challenges.  Although TRIZ has evolved over many years, it still remains relatively unknown and few companies seem to be ready to adopt this problem solving method.

An excellent article, “Enhancing TRIZ with Dr. Deming’s Philosophy“, by Ellen Domb and Bill Bellows, presents some interesting insights to this challenge.

We typically tend to avoid “labels” for the method we are using to solve a specific problem.  Unlike a surgeon “requesting specific tools (scalpel)” while performing an operation, our strategy tends to be a blended “hybrid” approach to problem solving; TRIZ happens to be one of the more effective methods that we have learned to use over the past few years.

The acceptance of TRIZ may be attributed to the current struggles many companies experience simply attempting to complete an 8D or 5-Why.  Of course, that would only be true of companies who are void of the Lean principles and methods – right?  TRIZ also has a perceived complexity that does not lend itself to ready adaptation as a company-wide problem solving tool.

We would recommend reviewing the many available books on the topic of TRIZ.  Integrating a tool such as TRIZ will require someone to become the leading expert.  Click here to see the various book selections that are available.

Unfortunately, for many companies, the discipline or the structure is simply not there to support effective problem solving efforts.  Perhaps if more time was spent solving the real problems, they would have more time to solve problems not yet realized.

Remember to get your TRIZ – Click Here!

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

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