Tag: OEE Measurement

OEE for Multiple Parts – Single Machine (Multipart Processes)

How to Calculate OEE for Single Machine and Multiple Parts.

Flexible manufacturing provides the advantage of producing many different parts on the same piece of equipment.  The same is true for processes such as stamping presses, molding machines, or machining operations.

The first question most often asked is, “How do we calculate OEE for a piece of equipment that is capable of manufacturing multiple parts?”  The overall OEE for a stamping press, molding machine, machining process, or other “multipart” process is easily calculated using the same formulas presented in our previous posts “How to Calculate OEE” and “Practical OEE“.

We presented three machines running at various rates and producing unique products.  We demonstrated how to calculate the OEE for each part individually and for all parts collectively.  The machines A, B, and C could very easily be parts A, B, and C running on one machine.  The application of the OEE formulas presented for these three machines is the same for multiple parts running on the same machine.

We have prepared two Excel spreadsheets that demonstrate how to calculate OEE for a single machine that produces multiple parts.  We have also created a separate Excel spreadsheet that will show you how to calculate OEE for Multiple Departments and Multiple Machines running Multiple Parts.

Calculating OEE for any period of time, department, or group of equipment is a simple task.  With the understanding that OEE measures how effectively Net Available Time is used to produce good parts at the ideal rate, the formula for any OEE calculation follows:

OEE (Any Category) = Total SUM of IDEAL Time / Total SUM of NET Available Time

Once this basic premise for OEE calculations is clearly understood, any combination of OEE summaries can be prepared including OEE summaries by Shift, Operator, Manager, Division, Process, and Process Type.

FREE Downloads 

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Multipart OEE – Confronting the Challenges

Most manufacturing environments are challenged with the task of minimizing inventories requiring more frequent change-overs or setups.  By far, the greatest challenge of multipart equipment is managing the change-over process and is usually reflected in the OEE Availability factor.

We recommend including setup or change-over time as part of the unplanned downtime calculation.  Then, by definition, one method to improve Availability is to reduce change-over or setup time.  Reductions in change-over time will also be reflected by improved Availability.  The Availability factor is now a useful metric for tracking improvements.

According to our definition, change-over time or setup time is measured from the end of the current production run (“the last good part made”) to the start of the next production run (“first good part produced”).  We have worked with some manufacturers that decided to do change-overs on the off shift so that they could avoid the down time penalty.  They clearly didn’t get the point – deferring the time when the change-over is performed doesn’t change the time required to perform it.

Several programs such as SMED (single minute exchange of dies) are available and, when coupled with best practices for quick die change (QDC) or quick tool change techniques, can greatly reduce the time lost during your tool change events.

We will consider posting best practices for SMED or QDC and would welcome any reader comments in this area.

We always welcome your feedback and comments.  Feel free to send us your questions or comments to leanexecution@gmail.com

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

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Weighted OEE: How To Calculate Total Plant OEE

In this post we will present a simple method to calculate a truly weighted OEE, including weighted factors Availability, Performance, and Quality.

The QUICK weighted OEE method:

Recalling our original definition of OEE, we are measuring how effectively our planned production time (net available time) is used to make a quality (saleable) product.  The weighted OEE then is the total time required to make a quality product divided by the total net available time.

From our examples in the “Calculating OEE” post, the following table summarizes the time required to produce quality products ONLY for machines A, B, and C:

  1. Machine A:  365 minutes
  2. Machine B:  318.75 minutes
  3. Machine C:  254.34 minutes

The total time to produce good quality (saleable) products is 938.09 minutes.

The total net available time for the three machines is 1365 minutes (3 * 455 minutes). 

The total weighted OEE for the 3 machines = 938.09 / 1365 = 68.72%

Calculating the Weighted Factors:

A similar process to the one described above can be applied to the individual factors.  It stands to reason that when the individual factors are multiplied together that we should get the same result.  We will use this to check our answer.

Weighted Availability:

Availability measures machine uptime efficiency.  The definition applied to an individual process also applies to the total of all the machines.  Availability is calculated using the formula:

Availability:  Net Operating Time / Net Available Time

From our examples in the “Calculating OEE” post, the following table summarizes the Net Operating Times for machines A, B, and C:

  1. Machine A:  423 minutes
  2. Machine B:  437 minutes
  3. Machine C:  433 minutes

The total Net Operating Time = 1293 minutes.

The total Net Available Time for the three machines is 1365 minutes (3 * 455 minutes). 

The weighted AVAILABILITY for the 3 machines = 1293 / 1365 = 94.73%

Weighted Performance:

Performance measures machine operating time efficiency when compared to the “ideal” cycle or operating time.  The definition applied to an individual process also applies to the total of all the machines.  Performance is calculated using the formula:

Performance:  Ideal Operating Time / Net Operating Time

From our examples in the “Calculating OEE” post, the following table summarizes the Ideal Operating Times for machines A, B, and C:

  1. Machine A:  373.33 minutes
  2. Machine B:  337.50 minutes
  3. Machine C:  267.17 minutes

The total Ideal Operating Time to produce ALL parts = 978 minutes.

The total Net Operating Time for the three machines is 1293 minutes (See Availability Calculations Above). 

The weighted PERFORMANCE for the 3 machines = 978 / 1293 = 75.64%

Weighted Quality:

Quality measures how efficiently the “ideal” operating time is used to produce quality (saleable) products.  Again, the definition applied to an individual process also applies to the total of all the machines.  Quality is calculated using the formula:

Quality:  Ideal Operating Time to Make Quality Parts / Ideal Operating Time

From our examples in the “Calculating OEE” post, the following table summarizes the Ideal Operating Time to produce Quality Parts ONLY for machines A, B, and C:

  1. Machine A:  365.00 minutes
  2. Machine B:  318.75 minutes
  3. Machine C:  254.34 minutes

The total Ideal Operating Time for Good Parts = 938.09 minutes.

The total Ideal Operating Time to produce ALL parts for the three machines is 978 minutes (See Performance Calculations Above). 

The weighted Quality for the 3 machines = 938.09 / 978.0 = 95.92%

Weighted OEE cross check:

Let’s compare the results.  From the calculations above, the results are summarized as follows:

  1. Weighted Availability:  94.73%
  2. Weighted Performance:  75.64%
  3. Weighted Quality:  95.92%

Now, we multiply the individual weighted OEE factors together:

OEE = 94.73% * 75.64% * 95.92% = 68.73%

You will see the result is the same as the Quick check introduced at the start of this post.

In our next post we will show you how to calculate the weighted factors for each individual process and introduce yet another way to confirm the weighted OEE calculation.

We have created a number of Excel spreadsheets that are immediately available for download from our FREE Downloads page or from the Free Downloads widget on the side bar.  These spreadsheets can be modified as required for your application.

If you have any questions, comments, concerns, or suggestions for a future topic, please forward them by e-mail to leanexecution@gmail.com  We look forward to hearing from you and trust this information will get you going.

Until Next Time, STAY Lean!

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OEE, Downtime, and TEEP

We have received several inquiries regarding equipment down time – periods of time when the machine is not scheduled to run.  We consider this to be scheduled down time or idle time and does not affect Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), since no production was planned during this period.

OEE measures overall equipment effectiveness during planned production or SCHEDULED up time.  Do not confuse idle time with tooling or material change over as these activities should be part of the scheduled machine time – periods where the machine is not scheduled to run.  After hours or weekends are examples of idle time.

TEEP or Total Equipment Effectiveness Performance is another variable, similar to OEE, and measures the Total Equipment Effectiveness Performance based on calendar time – the total time the equipment is “present”.  If process “A” is in your plant for 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, then the total time required to make good parts is divided by the time the asset, process, or equipment is “present” and is therefore “technically available” for the time frame being considered.  Typically this is based on calendar time – 24 hours per day and 7 days per week.

Another way to view TEEP is to consider it as a measure of how effectively the total capacity of a process or machine is being utilized to make GOOD parts.  In short, TEEP could be defined as a measure of Equipment Capacity Utilization Effectiveness.

TEEP Calculation Example:

In the metal stamping business, raw coil steel is processed through a die that runs in a stamping press to manufacture the parts.  The ideal cycle time for may be 30 strokes (or parts) per minute.  While the press may be scheduled to run for 16 hours, it is technically “present” or available 24 hours.  If, in a given day, a total of 18,000 GOOD parts were produced over 16 hours of scheduled production time, the OEE is easily calculated.

We will first calculate the IDEAL hours required to produce 18,000 parts at 30 spm.  The IDEAL rate per hour is 1,800 parts (30 spm * 60 minutes  / hour).  Therefore the IDEAL time to produce 18,000 good parts is 10 hours (18,000 parts / 1,800 per hour).

If this is a two shift operation, the net available time is 16 hours (scheduled) and the OEE for the day is calculated as 10 / 16 = 62.5 %.

Since the press is always present, 24 hours per day – 7 days per week, the Daily Equipment Effectiveness Performance (DEEP) in this case is 10 / 24 = 41.7 %.  While this example only represents a single 24 hour day, the basis for calculation is the same.  If the time frame is one week, one month, one quarter, the Total Equipment Effectiveness Performance for that time frame is calculated using the following formula:

TEEP = Total IDEAL Time to Produce Good Parts / Total Gross Time Available

FREE Downloads

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Feel free to leave any comments or send your questions to LeanExecution@gmail.com

Until next time – STAY Lean!

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