Category: Java

Machine Learning Algorithms

The next book adventure is “Machine Learning Algorithms” by Giuseppe Bonaccorso, Packt Publishing, (Jul 2017), 360 pages.

My initial preview suggests there is a lot to learn and so little time. Perhaps its time to let machines do more of the work.

Until Next Time – Stay lean!

Related Articles and Resources

  • Python Machine Learning – Second Edition by Sebastian Raschka and Vahid Mirjalili, Pack Publishing, (Sep 2017).
  • Machine Learning for Developers by Rodolfo Bonnin, Pack Publishing, (Oct 2017).
  • Statistic for Machine Learning by Pratap Dangeti, Packt Publishing, (Jul 2017).
  • Mastering Java Machine Learning by Dr. Udav Kamath and Krishna Choppella, Pack Publishing, (Jul 2017), 556 pages.
  • Java Machine Learning for Computer Vision (Video) by Klevis Ramo, Pack Publishing, (Jul 2018), 5 hours 6 minutes.
  • Machine Learning in Java – Second Edition – by AshishSingh Bhatia and Bostjan Kaluza, Packt Publishing, Nov 2018, 300 pages.
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JavaFX-12.0.1

With the recent release of Java Development Kit 12 (JDK 12), it’s time to upgrade to JavaFX-12.0.1 as well. JavaFX is now managed and released as it’s own independent entity and is not shipped as part of the Java Development Kit.

If you are new to Java and JavaFX, visit Getting Started with JavaFX 12 to install and test the latest version of JavaFX. Instructions are presented for use with Linux/Mac and Windows.

If you already have Java 12 installed, download the JavaFX runtime, unzip the file to your location of choice, and add the PATH_TO_FX environment variable: set PATH_TO_FX=”path\to\javafx-sdk-12\lib”

Now you’re ready to test the installation using the HelloFX.java sample which is available for download from GitHub.

From the command line, use javac to compile the program as follows:

  • javac –module-path %PATH_TO_FX% –add-modules javafx.controls HelloFX.java

Now execute the program using:

  • java –module-path %PATH_TO_FX% –add-modules javafx.controls HelloFX

If all went as planned, running the program should produce a window as pictured below:

Why JavaFX?

Every book, online tutorial, or course typically begin with writing programs that run on the console or terminal. An initial frustration for new users is that Interactive Development Environments or IDE’s such as Eclipse, NetBeans, or Visual Studio Code all use a Graphical User Interface or GUI interface and leaves us wondering why we can’t do graphics.

Of course, the books and tutorials do eventually address GUI’s; however, the subject of GUI’s is a topic for later chapters or course segments. Since JavaFX is not part of the JDK distribution, you must download it separately.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

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