Tag: Java

Machine Learning Algorithms

The next book adventure is “Machine Learning Algorithms” by Giuseppe Bonaccorso, Packt Publishing, (Jul 2017), 360 pages.

My initial preview suggests there is a lot to learn and so little time. Perhaps its time to let machines do more of the work.

Until Next Time – Stay lean!

Related Articles and Resources

  • Python Machine Learning – Second Edition by Sebastian Raschka and Vahid Mirjalili, Pack Publishing, (Sep 2017).
  • Machine Learning for Developers by Rodolfo Bonnin, Pack Publishing, (Oct 2017).
  • Statistic for Machine Learning by Pratap Dangeti, Packt Publishing, (Jul 2017).
  • Mastering Java Machine Learning by Dr. Udav Kamath and Krishna Choppella, Pack Publishing, (Jul 2017), 556 pages.
  • Java Machine Learning for Computer Vision (Video) by Klevis Ramo, Pack Publishing, (Jul 2018), 5 hours 6 minutes.
  • Machine Learning in Java – Second Edition – by AshishSingh Bhatia and Bostjan Kaluza, Packt Publishing, Nov 2018, 300 pages.
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JavaFX-12.0.1

With the recent release of Java Development Kit 12 (JDK 12), it’s time to upgrade to JavaFX-12.0.1 as well. JavaFX is now managed and released as it’s own independent entity and is not shipped as part of the Java Development Kit.

If you are new to Java and JavaFX, visit Getting Started with JavaFX 12 to install and test the latest version of JavaFX. Instructions are presented for use with Linux/Mac and Windows.

If you already have Java 12 installed, download the JavaFX runtime, unzip the file to your location of choice, and add the PATH_TO_FX environment variable: set PATH_TO_FX=”path\to\javafx-sdk-12\lib”

Now you’re ready to test the installation using the HelloFX.java sample which is available for download from GitHub.

From the command line, use javac to compile the program as follows:

  • javac –module-path %PATH_TO_FX% –add-modules javafx.controls HelloFX.java

Now execute the program using:

  • java –module-path %PATH_TO_FX% –add-modules javafx.controls HelloFX

If all went as planned, running the program should produce a window as pictured below:

Why JavaFX?

Every book, online tutorial, or course typically begin with writing programs that run on the console or terminal. An initial frustration for new users is that Interactive Development Environments or IDE’s such as Eclipse, NetBeans, or Visual Studio Code all use a Graphical User Interface or GUI interface and leaves us wondering why we can’t do graphics.

Of course, the books and tutorials do eventually address GUI’s; however, the subject of GUI’s is a topic for later chapters or course segments. Since JavaFX is not part of the JDK distribution, you must download it separately.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Related Articles and Resources

Back to Class with C++

What does C++ have to do with lean?

The language itself may not do much for lean as we know it, however, learning a new language affords us the opportunity to become students once again.

When we share and teach lean principles, it’s easy to forget what it’s like to be on the receiving end of all that information.  In other words, we often lose sight of what it means to be the student.

  • We ask questions:  Who, what, where, when, why, and how?
  • We overcome resistance to change when we recognize and value our vested interests in the current state.
  • We have a threshold for learning – small units at a time improve absorption and keeps us from getting overwhelmed.
  • We imprint – we learn by doing to improve retention and enhance our learning experience.
  • We understand and work on the premise that there’s always a better way and there’s more than one solution.
  • We celebrate our successes.

Computers are a part of our everyday life both at work and at home. Learning another language provides the opportunity to create and develop software applications that enhance our experience and the experience of others in the future.

Why C++?

Computers have evolved over the years from desktops, laptops, and netbooks to tablets, mobile phones, and even watches! This rapidly changing ecosystem has enabled new technologies that require more evolved object-oriented languages like C++. A growing number of platforms and devices makes choosing a language to support them that much more difficult. Our decision to choose one language over another is dependent on the Operating System and / or hardware that will run our applications – Apple, Microsoft Windows, Unix, Linux, or Android.

There was a time when we used Basic, Fortran, Assembly (x86), and C to develop applications. As Microsoft’s Office suite became more popular, we even extended our expertise to include visual basic for applications (VBA). Assembly language is a low-level language that requires a thorough knowledge of both the hardware and the operating system for a given machine. A medium to high level language such as C/C++ allows us to concern ourselves with the functional aspects of the application rather than the details of the hardware itself.

C++ is fast, fully compiled, object-oriented, portable, and standardized (ANSI and ISO). Standardization assures a higher level of stability and support for a minimum set of language features across multiple platforms. While other object-oriented programming languages exist, like Java and C#, we selected C++ for now. Texts for Java and C# are also part of our language library for consideration on future projects.

Getting Started with C++

The first book you read on a given language will become the lens through which all others are viewed.  In other words, your first book will establish or heavily influence your baseline thinking going forward.

Before selecting any book on programming, read the inside and outside covers as well as the introduction to determine if the book meets with your level of experience and requirements. You should also note that authors typically choose a development system that forms the basis for the lessons that follow.

Though a standard exists for the C++ language, use of the Integrated Development Environment (IDE) and compiler options depends on the product you choose.

The books:

Each book discusses the resources, including software, required to successfully set up C++ and the applicable Integrated Development Environment on your computer. Using a well designed Integrated Development Environment (IDE) simplifies the process of programming, compiling, and linking your programs.

We successfully installed CodeBlocks with the MinGW compiler as well as Microsoft’s Visual C++ Express. Use the internet to see what resources are available – you’ll be surprised at the amount of information that’s available and much of it is free. It’s worth your time to Google “C++” to see what’s out there.

Our Goal

Our goal is to review each book’s ability to teach us the C++ language. As we are learning the language, we cannot attest to the “correctness” or integrity of the content being taught in these books. We’ll share our experiences and thoughts as we dig deeper into the world of C++.

Your feedback matters

If you have any comments, questions, or topics you would like us to address, please feel free to leave your comment in the space below or email us at feedback@leanexecution.ca or feedback@versalytics.com.  We look forward to hearing from you and thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY lean

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