Tag: OEE Factors

OEE For Manufacturing

We are often asked what companies (or types of companies) are using OEE as part of their daily operations.  While our focus has been primarily in the automotive industry, we are highly encouraged by the level of integration deployed in the Semiconductor Industry.  We have found an excellent article that describes how OEE among other metrics is being used to sustain and improve performance in the semiconductor industry.

Somehow it is not surprising to learn the semiconductor industry has established a high level of OEE integration in their operations.  Perhaps this is the reason why electronics continue to improve at such a rapid pace in both technology and price.

To get a better understanding of how the semiconductor industry has integrated OEE and other related metrics into their operational strategy, click here.

The article clearly presents a concise hierarchy of metrics (including OEE) typically used in operations and includes their interactions and dependencies.  The semiconductor industry serves as a great benchmark for OEE integration and how it is used as powerful tool to improve operations.

While we have reviewed some articles that describe OEE as an over rated metric, we believe that the proof of wisdom is in the result.  The semiconductor industry is exemplary in this regard.  It is clear that electronics industry “gets it”.

As we have mentioned in many of our previous posts, OEE should not be an isolated metric.  While it can be assessed and reviewed independently, it is important to understand the effect on the system and organization as a whole.

We appreciate your feedback.  Please feel free to leave us a comment or send us an e-mail with your suggestions to leanexecution@gmail.com

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Advertisements

OEE Topics for 2009

We changed our theme!

Today was another day to do a little maintenance. We spent a little time revamping our look and feel. We hope you enjoy the changes and find our site a little easier to navigate.  We updated our Free Downloads page to present another easier and more direct venue to get your files instantly using Box.Net. If you’re already familiar with WordPress, you know how great this widget is. Downloads could never be faster or easier.

We also took some time to update some of our pages. We would suggest, however, that the best detailed content appears in the individual articles that we have posted.

Upcoming Topics for 2009

  1. Tracking OEE Improvements:  We have noticed an increase in the number of requests to discuss tracking OEE improvements.  We have been working on a few different approaches even for our own consulting practice and look forward to sharing some thoughts and ideas here.
  2. How OEE can improve your Cost of Non-Quality.  It’s more than yield.
  3. What OEE can do for your Inventory.  Improvements should be cascading to other areas of your operation – including the warehouse.
  4. Innovation – Defining your future with OEE
  5. OEE and Agile – Going beyond lean with OEE.
  6. Best Practices – OEE in real life, in real time

If you would like to suggest a topic for a future post, ask a question, or make a suggestion, please leave a comment or simply send an e-mail to LeanExecution@gmail.com or vergence.consulting@gmail.com.  We do appreciate your feedback.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence Business Associates

We respect your privacy, your information will not be shared, sold, or distributed to any third parties.  We will only use your e-mail to communicate with you at your request.  You will not be subject to any advertising or marketing campaigns.

Cost Weighted OEE and other free OEE Spreadsheet Templates

OEE Spreadsheet Templates – One Click Closer:

As the days of summer are upon us, we thought it would be good idea to make it easier for you to access our free downloads so you can spend more time doing the things you want to do.  We have updated our site and we are pleased to offer you four ways to download our OEE spreadsheet templates:

  1. We added a new page titled “Downloads
  2. We also added a new Link List to the sidebar titled “Download Files”
  3. We made the FREE DOWNLOADS orange Box file a little larger and easier to read.
  4. We will include direct access links in the content of our posts.

Your OEE templates are literally a click away – saving you time and effort.

Cost Weighted OEE – Advanced OEE Template

We have received numerous requests for our “Cost Weighted OEE” template.  Many people are starting to realize that the OEE factors for availability, performance, and quality are not directly correlated.  Of course, we have also discussed our concerns in this regard on several occasions and will state again that OEE is not a stand alone metric.  As a vantage point metric, it can provide a valuable perspective on operations in real time, however, it is only one part of the overall equation.

Rex Gallaher wrote an excellent article titled “OEE Oxymoron; Are all factors truly equal?” that was published by ReliablePlant.com on February 18, 2009.  This article also conveys the premise that the OEE factors are not equal.  Understanding the financial impact of each of the OEE factors will assure that efforts and energy are focused on activities that will provide the greatest return on investment for your company.

To celebrate our site updates, we thought we would give you at least one more reason to see how our download venues work.  A copy of the Cost Weighted OEE Template is now available through all three of our download venues or you can Click HERE to get immediate access to the file.

For a detailed discussion of OEE and how it can (and should not) be used to identify opportunities to eliminate waste and reduce costs, click on one of the links below:

  1. OEE and Cost Control – Published in December, 2008
  2. 6 Things OEE is NOT! – Published in April, 2009
  3. Make or Break with OEE – Published in May, 2009

In light of the current economy, many companies have been forced to look inward to find “new” money.  OEE is one of the few lean metrics available that can help your organization to focus on the greatest opportunities with measurable returns.  We trust the templates and spreadsheet solutions that we offer here will help you in your quest.

For more information, click on the Categories section of the sidebar to search for other articles on our Blog that may be of interest to you.  They can provide significant insight into the many aspects of operations and OEE and may serve as part of your ongoing training efforts.

We appreciate your feedback.  Please feel free to leave a comment or send an e-mail with your suggestions for a future topic, comments, questions, or concerns to leanexecution@gmail.com or versalytics@gmail.com

Until next time – STAY lean!

OEE Training – Online

Getting Started

Online Training is more rampant now than ever.  If you want to learn about OEE and how to calculate it correctly then we have all the information you need right here.  Simply click on the categories of interest to you and research your specific topic or Click Here to get started.  This is the first article that got us started in November of 2008.  All of our online content is presently available at no charge.

Free Spreadsheet Templates

We offer several OEE Spreadhseet Templates that are available at no cost to our visitors and clients. Feel free to click on the “Free Downloads” template on the sidebar.  This is a new feature and trust that you will find this a much easier solution that provides immediate access to our documents.  If you can’t find what you are looking for, contact us by e-mail (leanexecution@gmail.com) or leave a comment with your suggestions for other templates that you would like to see available on our site.

Advanced Visitors

We trust that the content presented here is of interest to you as well.  We have provided many articles of interest related to OEE and Lean.  Simply review the categories and posts available or visit our pages for more information.  Our articles present detailed discussions and best practices applicable to the featured topic.

If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions for a future topic, simply leave a comment or send an e-mail to leanexecution@gmail.com or vergence.consulting@gmail.com.  We respect your privacy.  We will not share, disclose, sell, or distribute your e-mail or personal information with any third parties.  Your e-mail will only be used to contact you at your request.  You will not be subject to any advertising or marketing campaigns.  See our privacy policy for more details.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence Business Associates

Variance, Waste, and OEE

What gets managed MUST be measured – Including VARIANCE.

It is easy to get excited about the many opportunities that a well implemented LEAN Strategy can bring to your organization.  Even more exciting are the results.

Achieving improvement objectives implies that some form of measurement process exists – the proof.  A clear link should be established to the metric you choose and the activity being managed to support the ongoing improvement initiatives.

Measure with Meaning

Why are you “collecting” OEE data?  While OEE can and should be used to measure the effectiveness of your manufacturing operations, OEE on its own does not present a complete solution.  It is true that OEE presents a single metric that serves as an indicator of performance, however, it does not provide any insight with respect to VARIANCES that are or may be present in the system.

We have encountered numerous operations where OEE data can be very misleading.  OEE data can be calculated using various measurement categories:  by machine, part number, shift, employee, supervisor, department, day, month, and so on.

VARIANCE:  the leading cause of waste!

Quality professionals are more than familiar with variance.  Statistically capable processes are every quality managers dream.  Unfortunately, very little attention or focus is applied to variances experienced on the production side of the business.

Some may be reading this and wonder where this is going.  The answer is simple, rates of production are subject to variance.  Quite simply, if you review the individual OEE results of any machine for each run over an extended period of time, you will notice that the number is not a constant.  The performance, availability, and quality factors are all different from one run to the next.  One run may experience more downtime than another, a sluggish machine may result in reduced in performance, or material problems may be giving rise to increased quality failures (scrap).

So, while the OEE trend may show improvement over time, it is clear that variances are present in the process.  Quality professionals readily understand the link between process variation and product quality.  Similarly, variation in process rates and equipment reliability factors affect the OEE for a given machine.

We recommend performing a statistical analysis of the raw data for each factor that comprises OEE (Availability, Performance, and Quality) for individual processes.  Analysis of OEE itself requires an understanding of the underlying factors.  It is impractical to consider the application of ANOVA to OEE itself as the goal is to continually improve.

How much easier would it be if you could schedule a machine to run parts and know that you will get them when you needed them?  You can’t skip the process deep dive.  You need to understand how each process affects the overall top-level OEE index that is performance so you can develop and implement specific improvement actions.

The best demonstration we have seen that illustrates how process variation impacts your operation is presented through a “process simulation” developed from Eli Goldratt’s book, The Goal.  We will share this simulation in a separate post.  Experiencing the effect of process variation is much more meaningful and memorable than a spreadsheet full of numbers.

Conflict Management and OEE

In some environments we have encountered, the interpretation of LEAN strategy at the shop floor level is to set minimum OEE performance objectives with punitive consequences.  This type of strategy is certainly in conflict with any Lean initiative.  The lean objective is to learn as much as possible from the process and to identify opportunities for continual improvement.

Management by intimidation is becoming more of a rarity, however, we have found that they also give rise to the OEE genius.  If performance is measured daily, the OEE genius will make sure a high performing job is part of the mix to improve the “overall” result.  This is akin to taking an easy course of study to “pull up” your overall average.

It is clear from this example, that you will miss opportunities to improve your operation if the culture is tainted by conflicting performance objectives.  The objective is to reveal sources of variation to eliminate waste and variation in your process, not find better ways to hide it.

Variance in daily output rates are normal.  How much are you willing to accept?  Do you know what normal is?  Understanding process variance and OEE as complementary metrics will surely help to identify more opportunities for improvement.

FREE Downloads

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Please forward your questions, comments, or suggestions to LeanExecution@gmail.com.  To request our services for a specific project, please send your inquiries to Vergence.Consulting@gmail.com.

We welcome your feedback and thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

"Click"

Problem Solving with OEE – Measuring Success

OEE in Perspective

As mentioned in our previous posts, OEE is a terrific metric for measuring and monitoring ongoing performance in your operation.  However, like many metrics, it can become the focus rather than the gage of performance it is intended to be.

The objective of measuring OEE is to identify opportunities where improvements can be made or to determine whether the changes to your process provided the results you were seeking to achieve.  Lean organizations predict performance expectations and document the reasons to support the anticipated results .  The measurement system used to monitor performance serves as a gauge to determine whether the reasons for the actual outcomes were valid.  A “miss” to target indicates that something is wrong with the reasoning – whether the result is positive or negative.

Lean organizations are learning continually and recognize the need to understand why and how processes work.  Predicting results with supported documentation verifies the level of understanding of the process itself.  Failing to predict the result is an indicator that the process is not yet fully understood.

Problem Solving with OEE

Improvement strategies that are driven by OEE should cause the focus to shift to specific elements or areas in your operation such as reduction in tool change-over or setup time, improved material handling strategies, or quality improvement initiatives.  Focusing on the basic tenets of Lean will ultimately lead to improvements in OEE.  See the process in operation (first-hand), identify opportunities for improvement, immediately resolve,  implement and document corrective actions, then share the knowledge with the team and the company.

Understanding and Managing Variance:

OEE data is subject to variation like any other process in your operation.  What are the sources of variation?  If there is a constant effort to improve performance, then you would expect to see positive performance trends.  However, monitoring OEE and attempting to maintain positive performance trends can be a real challenge if the variances are left unchecked.

Availability

What if change-over times or setup times have been dramatically reduced?  Rather than setting a job to run once a week, it has now been decided to run it daily (five times per week).  What if the total downtime was the same to make the same number of parts over the same period of time?  Did we make an improvement?

The availability factor may very well be the same.  We would suggest that, yes, a signficant improvement was made.  While the OEE may remain the same, the inventory turns may increase substantially and certainly the inventory on hand could be converted into sales much more readily.  So, the improvement will ultimately be measured by a different metric.

Performance

Cycle time reductions are typically used to demonstrate improvements in the reported OEE.  In some cases, methods have been changed to improve the throughput of the process, in other cases the process was never optimized from the start.  In other instances, parts are run on a different and faster machine resulting in higher rates of production.  The latter case does not necessarily mean the OEE has improved since the base line used to measure it has changed.

Quality

Another example pertains to manual operations ultimately controlled through human effort.  The standard cycle time for calculating OEE is based on one operator running the machine.  In an effort to improve productivity, a second operator is added.  The performance factor of the operation may improve, however, the conditions have changed.  The perceived OEE improvement may not be an improvement at all.  Another metric such as Labour Variance or Efficiency may actually show a decline.

Another perceived improvement pertains to Quality.  Hopefully there aren’t to many examples like this one – changing the acceptance criteria to allow more parts to pass as acceptable, fit for function, or saleable product (although it is possible that the original standards were too high).

Standards

Changing standards is not the same as changing the process.  Consider another more obvious example pertaining to availability.  Assume the change over time for a process is 3o minutes and the total planned production time is 1 hour (including change over time).  For simplicity of the calculation no other downtime is assumed.  The availability in this case is 50% ((60 – 30) / 60).

To “improve” the availability we could have run for another hour and the resulting availability would be 75% (120 – 30) / 120.  The availability will show an improvement but the change-over process itself has not changed.  This is clearly an example of time management, perhaps even inventory control, not process change.

This last example also demonstrates why comparing shifts may be compromised when using OEE as a stand-alone metric.  What if one shift completed the setup in 20 minutes and could only run for 30 minutes before the shift was over (Availability = 60%).  The next shift comes in and runs for 8 hours without incident or down time (Availability = 100%).  Which shift really did a better job all other factors being equal?

Caution

When working with OEE, be careful how the results are used and certainly consider how the results could be compromised if the culture has not adopted the real meaning of Lean Thinking.  The metric is there to help you improve your operation – not figure out ways to beat the system!

FREE Downloads

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Please forward your questions, comments, or suggestions to LeanExecution@gmail.com.  To request our services for a specific project, please send your inquiries to Vergence.Consulting@gmail.com.

We welcome your feedback and thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

"Click"

OEE for Multiple Parts – Single Machine (Multipart Processes)

How to Calculate OEE for Single Machine and Multiple Parts.

Flexible manufacturing provides the advantage of producing many different parts on the same piece of equipment.  The same is true for processes such as stamping presses, molding machines, or machining operations.

The first question most often asked is, “How do we calculate OEE for a piece of equipment that is capable of manufacturing multiple parts?”  The overall OEE for a stamping press, molding machine, machining process, or other “multipart” process is easily calculated using the same formulas presented in our previous posts “How to Calculate OEE” and “Practical OEE“.

We presented three machines running at various rates and producing unique products.  We demonstrated how to calculate the OEE for each part individually and for all parts collectively.  The machines A, B, and C could very easily be parts A, B, and C running on one machine.  The application of the OEE formulas presented for these three machines is the same for multiple parts running on the same machine.

We have prepared two Excel spreadsheets that demonstrate how to calculate OEE for a single machine that produces multiple parts.  We have also created a separate Excel spreadsheet that will show you how to calculate OEE for Multiple Departments and Multiple Machines running Multiple Parts.

Calculating OEE for any period of time, department, or group of equipment is a simple task.  With the understanding that OEE measures how effectively Net Available Time is used to produce good parts at the ideal rate, the formula for any OEE calculation follows:

OEE (Any Category) = Total SUM of IDEAL Time / Total SUM of NET Available Time

Once this basic premise for OEE calculations is clearly understood, any combination of OEE summaries can be prepared including OEE summaries by Shift, Operator, Manager, Division, Process, and Process Type.

FREE Downloads 

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Multipart OEE – Confronting the Challenges

Most manufacturing environments are challenged with the task of minimizing inventories requiring more frequent change-overs or setups.  By far, the greatest challenge of multipart equipment is managing the change-over process and is usually reflected in the OEE Availability factor.

We recommend including setup or change-over time as part of the unplanned downtime calculation.  Then, by definition, one method to improve Availability is to reduce change-over or setup time.  Reductions in change-over time will also be reflected by improved Availability.  The Availability factor is now a useful metric for tracking improvements.

According to our definition, change-over time or setup time is measured from the end of the current production run (“the last good part made”) to the start of the next production run (“first good part produced”).  We have worked with some manufacturers that decided to do change-overs on the off shift so that they could avoid the down time penalty.  They clearly didn’t get the point – deferring the time when the change-over is performed doesn’t change the time required to perform it.

Several programs such as SMED (single minute exchange of dies) are available and, when coupled with best practices for quick die change (QDC) or quick tool change techniques, can greatly reduce the time lost during your tool change events.

We will consider posting best practices for SMED or QDC and would welcome any reader comments in this area.

We always welcome your feedback and comments.  Feel free to send us your questions or comments to leanexecution@gmail.com

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

"Click"