Tag: Waste and OEE

OEE For Manufacturing

We are often asked what companies (or types of companies) are using OEE as part of their daily operations.  While our focus has been primarily in the automotive industry, we are highly encouraged by the level of integration deployed in the Semiconductor Industry.  We have found an excellent article that describes how OEE among other metrics is being used to sustain and improve performance in the semiconductor industry.

Somehow it is not surprising to learn the semiconductor industry has established a high level of OEE integration in their operations.  Perhaps this is the reason why electronics continue to improve at such a rapid pace in both technology and price.

To get a better understanding of how the semiconductor industry has integrated OEE and other related metrics into their operational strategy, click here.

The article clearly presents a concise hierarchy of metrics (including OEE) typically used in operations and includes their interactions and dependencies.  The semiconductor industry serves as a great benchmark for OEE integration and how it is used as powerful tool to improve operations.

While we have reviewed some articles that describe OEE as an over rated metric, we believe that the proof of wisdom is in the result.  The semiconductor industry is exemplary in this regard.  It is clear that electronics industry “gets it”.

As we have mentioned in many of our previous posts, OEE should not be an isolated metric.  While it can be assessed and reviewed independently, it is important to understand the effect on the system and organization as a whole.

We appreciate your feedback.  Please feel free to leave us a comment or send us an e-mail with your suggestions to leanexecution@gmail.com

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

OEE Integration: Can you fix it?

As we are all aware, inspecting or measuring parts does not change the quality of the product.   Likewise, measuring and reporting OEE alone does not solve problems or improve performance.  While it is fair to say that increased focus and measurement of any process usually results in some degree of improvement, these are typically attributed to changes in human behavior due to observation and not necessarily real process improvements.

Using OEE to identify opportunities in your operation is the equivalent of turning the light on in a dark room.  Although the room hasn’t changed, we certainly have a better understanding of what it looks like.  As such, OEE is a vantage point metric that can be used to illuminate our understanding of the process and identify opportunities to drive improvements.

It is essential for your team to develop and utilize effective problem solving skills to successfully identify systemic and process root causes for failure and to develop and execute permanent corrective actions to resolve them.  Our experience suggests that the lack of solid and proven problem solving skills coupled with poor execution is the leading cause of failure for new initiatives such as OEE.

We introduced an approach to improving OEE in our “Improve OEE:  A Hands On Approach“, post (03-Jan-09).  Although we identified some of the tools that could be used to solve of the problems, we didn’t spend much time going into the details.  Over the next few posts, we’ll discuss some of the ideas in a little more detail.

The real problem for most companies is identifying what the real underlying root cause of the current “failure” mode is.  Without a good understanding of the root cause, the solutions developed and implemented will not be effective, only serving to temporarily cure the immediate superficial symptoms.

Using effective problem solving skills to analyze the OEE data and to develop and execute permanent corrective actions will assure sustainable and ever improving performance.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Upcoming OEE Topics – February 2009

The following topics will be featured in an upcoming post, we’ll try to squeeze them in before February 2009 rolls off the calendar.  If you have a topic that you would like to see featured on our site, send an e-mail to LeanExecution@gmail.com.

Capacity Planning with OEE:  By definition, it only makes sense to use OEE as an integral part of your capacity planning process.  We will cover the details to do this effectively.  Effective capacity planning naturally extends to improved resource management and effective production planning.

OEE, Value Streams, and COST:  Although some managers may rise to the challenge and volunteer, many are either assigned or designated to be project champions.  In many cases, unfortunately, the scope of the project is extremely limited or restricted and project managers simply become “metric managers”.  Who is in charge of OEE?  The answer is quite simple:  EVERYONE.  OEE is a multi-discipline metric and, like other sound lean strategies, requires seamless interaction among managers and departments.

OEE cannot and should not be managed as an independent metric.  Having said that, don’t get caught in the trap of “stand alone” OEE reviews.  While there may be a number of strategies for improving OEE, such as constrained capacity, we will present a model that explicitly ties operational costs to your processes.  When OEE data is sensitised by cost data, a completely different strategy for improvement will emerge.  If the ultimate goal is to improve your bottom line, then our Cost sensitisation model will bring the concept of OEE and your bottom line to a whole new level.

OEE and Lean Agility:  Can OEE be a leading indicator of your ability to respond to change?  Well we think so and happen to have a few ideas that will show you how and why.

Send us your questions or comments or simply suggest a topic for a future post or article.

Stay tuned for more!  We appreciate your feedback.

OEE and Morale

Is employee morale impacting your OEE?  If so, how much of a concern is it?  As we wrote in one of our recent posts,  “Perhaps the greatest “external” influence on current manufacturing operations is the rapid collapse of the automotive industry in the midst of our current economic “melt down”.  The changes in operating strategy to respond to this new crisis are bound to have an effect on OEE among other business metrics.”  We would argue that these times of economic crisis demand, now more than ever, that Lean Practices must become even more prevalent in our manufacturing operations.

People are concerned about the state and stability of the company’s finances and the industries they serve.  The automotive industry has been devastated by the recent decline, or more accurately, collapse of the market.  Significant changes in operating strategy including lay offs and reduced production days have impacted all of the OEM’s including Ford, GM, Chrysler, Toyota, and Honda.  No one company is immune from the effects of the current economic conditions.

It is clear that the auto industry fell behind the “power curve” and crashed.  Did conditions change too quickly to avoid the inevitable?  Was it so big that, like the Titanic, the ultimate demise could be predicted but not avoided?  Toyota was the number one producer of automobiles in 2008 but failed to yield significant profits.  Conditions such as these were ripe for continued growth in years past.  It is clear that even the best of the Lean practitioners are not immune from the effects of the current economy.

A company’s agility will certainly be tested during times such as these.  Sustainability and viability are among the few significant objectives of Lean dynamics.  As such, Lean dynamics should be at the forefront of every business leader.  How adaptable is your business?  Are you reinventing your business in response to the changes of your industry?  The true Lean practitioner is certainly challenged to eliminate waste and variation beyond current means and traditional approaches.  As change is constant, we must continually seek out ways to redefine or “better” define our businesses.

At the most fundamental level, everyone is concerned about the state of the economy, however, individuals, at the personal level, are concerned about their jobs and careers.  We all want to preserve our current life style to some degree and, at a minimum, continue to pay our bills.  It would be a difficult task to estimate the lost productivity that occurs when someone’s state of mind is focused on their own personal situation versus that of the company.  We have observed first hand how employee morale has diminished as a result of the recent economic doom and gloom.  Nothing can come between an indivual and their prosperity – this is an instinctive, almost primitive, response mechanism – a self defense position.

Recommendations:

While you may not be able to change the economy, we would suggest that you can influence the “morale” of your employees.  People will understand that you didn’t cause the current economic crisis, however, they do expect that you will let them know what the impact is to your business and ultimately to themselves.

Be honest with your employees, let them know where you stand – where they stand.  They need to prepare for their futures too, whether it is working for you or someone else.  During times of crisis such as this, it is time for the executive leadership to stand behind their Vision and Mission statements and treat their employees – THE PEOPLE -the most important assets a company can have – with the dignity and respect they not only deserve but worked so hard to earn.  Be present and available to your team.

Our employees recognize that we only attract, retain, and hire the best employees.  Regardless of the economy, the standard remains and we take great pride in the strength of our people.  They know this intrinsically.

People come to companies to work for PEOPLE.  Their immediate supervisor or manager is, in their eyes, the company.  Arm your staff with the information they need so people can make informed decisions.  Believe it or not, people are motivated when they feel that they are part of the process and not regarded as part of the problem.  Reality check:  “People come to companies to work for themselves.”  How does this statement change your perspective?  Who do you work for?

How many times have you heard, “Our labour is just too high,  we need to cut back.”  Well, who made the decision to hire the people in the first place?  Look in the mirror.  Treat people like they are part of the team, part of the solution.  Get them engaged and focused on moving forward.  Will they be motivated?  They will be if they feel that they are valued players on the team, performing meaningful work that is contributing to the success of the company.  Times of crisis tend to bring teams closer together and, in the end, they become stronger for the cause.

A great business parable written by Patrick Lencioni, “The Three Signs of a Miserable Job”, may provide some useful insights to motivate your team and even grow your business into a more profitable venture despite the current economic crisis.

While people think they work for a company or other people, we ultimately believe that people work for themselves and we, as a company, are the beneficiaries of their efforts.

Conclusion

So how does all of this tie to OEE?  Weill, performance typically lags when people are not focused on the task at hand.  There is a sense that, no matter what they do, they can’t change the current circumstances so, “Why bother?”  Distractions of this magnitude are hard to ignore.  As the leadership of the company, it is your responsibility to be in tune with the morale of your team and workforce in general.  It is possible to mitigate the effects of low morale by addressing them early on and encouraging employees to be part of the turn around process.

This might be one of the few times in history where the term “CHANGE” will be viewed in a positive light and actually be embraced by your team.

We may just discover the 5S process for managing our economy with a real process in place to manage the fifth “S” Sustainability.  Another one of the “anomalies” that just don’t make sense is, “This is just part of the nautral cycle of the economy.  We were long overdue.”  Somehow, that doesn’t say much about our governments or industry leaders. Why?  Because it suggests we should have been more than prepared to deal with this a long time ago.  The current scramble suggests the contrary to be true.  Secondly, what is “natural” about the economy – it’s manmade – driven by the decisions of business leaders and governments around the globe.  Natural? Never.  A logical excuse that every one seems to accept as part of “nature”?  Maybe.

Until next time – STAY Lean!

Variance, Waste, and OEE

What gets managed MUST be measured – Including VARIANCE.

It is easy to get excited about the many opportunities that a well implemented LEAN Strategy can bring to your organization.  Even more exciting are the results.

Achieving improvement objectives implies that some form of measurement process exists – the proof.  A clear link should be established to the metric you choose and the activity being managed to support the ongoing improvement initiatives.

Measure with Meaning

Why are you “collecting” OEE data?  While OEE can and should be used to measure the effectiveness of your manufacturing operations, OEE on its own does not present a complete solution.  It is true that OEE presents a single metric that serves as an indicator of performance, however, it does not provide any insight with respect to VARIANCES that are or may be present in the system.

We have encountered numerous operations where OEE data can be very misleading.  OEE data can be calculated using various measurement categories:  by machine, part number, shift, employee, supervisor, department, day, month, and so on.

VARIANCE:  the leading cause of waste!

Quality professionals are more than familiar with variance.  Statistically capable processes are every quality managers dream.  Unfortunately, very little attention or focus is applied to variances experienced on the production side of the business.

Some may be reading this and wonder where this is going.  The answer is simple, rates of production are subject to variance.  Quite simply, if you review the individual OEE results of any machine for each run over an extended period of time, you will notice that the number is not a constant.  The performance, availability, and quality factors are all different from one run to the next.  One run may experience more downtime than another, a sluggish machine may result in reduced in performance, or material problems may be giving rise to increased quality failures (scrap).

So, while the OEE trend may show improvement over time, it is clear that variances are present in the process.  Quality professionals readily understand the link between process variation and product quality.  Similarly, variation in process rates and equipment reliability factors affect the OEE for a given machine.

We recommend performing a statistical analysis of the raw data for each factor that comprises OEE (Availability, Performance, and Quality) for individual processes.  Analysis of OEE itself requires an understanding of the underlying factors.  It is impractical to consider the application of ANOVA to OEE itself as the goal is to continually improve.

How much easier would it be if you could schedule a machine to run parts and know that you will get them when you needed them?  You can’t skip the process deep dive.  You need to understand how each process affects the overall top-level OEE index that is performance so you can develop and implement specific improvement actions.

The best demonstration we have seen that illustrates how process variation impacts your operation is presented through a “process simulation” developed from Eli Goldratt’s book, The Goal.  We will share this simulation in a separate post.  Experiencing the effect of process variation is much more meaningful and memorable than a spreadsheet full of numbers.

Conflict Management and OEE

In some environments we have encountered, the interpretation of LEAN strategy at the shop floor level is to set minimum OEE performance objectives with punitive consequences.  This type of strategy is certainly in conflict with any Lean initiative.  The lean objective is to learn as much as possible from the process and to identify opportunities for continual improvement.

Management by intimidation is becoming more of a rarity, however, we have found that they also give rise to the OEE genius.  If performance is measured daily, the OEE genius will make sure a high performing job is part of the mix to improve the “overall” result.  This is akin to taking an easy course of study to “pull up” your overall average.

It is clear from this example, that you will miss opportunities to improve your operation if the culture is tainted by conflicting performance objectives.  The objective is to reveal sources of variation to eliminate waste and variation in your process, not find better ways to hide it.

Variance in daily output rates are normal.  How much are you willing to accept?  Do you know what normal is?  Understanding process variance and OEE as complementary metrics will surely help to identify more opportunities for improvement.

FREE Downloads

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Please forward your questions, comments, or suggestions to LeanExecution@gmail.com.  To request our services for a specific project, please send your inquiries to Vergence.Consulting@gmail.com.

We welcome your feedback and thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

"Click"