Tag: Free OEE Templates

Going DEEP with OEE

Does anyone actually look at their daily equipment availability? Instead of using TEEP that is typically based on calendarized availability, looking at the Daily Equipment Effectiveness Performance of your operation may provide some interesting insights.

Working overtime due to material or equipment availability occurs many times.  Unfortunately, we find that sometimes these very same machines are idle during the week.

A detailed explanation for calculating DEEP can be found in one of our earlier posts, “OEE, Downtime, and TEEP.”  Understanding machine utilization patterns may provide greater insight into the actual versus planned operating pattern of your process.

Just something to invoke some thoughts for your operation and to perhaps identify another opportunity to improve performance.

FREE Downloads

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Please forward your questions, comments, or suggestions to LeanExecution@gmail.com.  To request our services for a specific project, please send your inquiries to Vergence.Consulting@gmail.com.

We welcome your feedback and thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

Advertisements

OEE in the Automotive Industry

The automotive industry appears to be rebounding at a faster rate than most (if not all) experts may have anticipated.  Many OEM’s and their suppliers are attempting to boost production to replenish inventories and support renewed demand for their products.  Reduced inventories throughout the supply chain are creating demand that is difficult to replenish at the rate required.  Short runs to bootstrap the “pipeline” are taking their toll on OEE rates but also provide the opportunity to identify new improvement initiatives.

General Motors and Toyota have both announced that increased demand for their product is anticipated for the next few months.  The increases are exciting for all involved, however, the ramp up to recovery may be more painful to achieve for some.  How is your company performing?  Those with fixed “cells” or processes may not be experiencing the same degree of frustration as those having flexible processes running multiple part numbers.

Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) typically suffers during these times due to the frequent changeovers and short volume runs.  If there was a time when you can’t change over or setup and run fast enough, this may be it.  Hang on and enjoy the ride.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

OEE For Manufacturing

We are often asked what companies (or types of companies) are using OEE as part of their daily operations.  While our focus has been primarily in the automotive industry, we are highly encouraged by the level of integration deployed in the Semiconductor Industry.  We have found an excellent article that describes how OEE among other metrics is being used to sustain and improve performance in the semiconductor industry.

Somehow it is not surprising to learn the semiconductor industry has established a high level of OEE integration in their operations.  Perhaps this is the reason why electronics continue to improve at such a rapid pace in both technology and price.

To get a better understanding of how the semiconductor industry has integrated OEE and other related metrics into their operational strategy, click here.

The article clearly presents a concise hierarchy of metrics (including OEE) typically used in operations and includes their interactions and dependencies.  The semiconductor industry serves as a great benchmark for OEE integration and how it is used as powerful tool to improve operations.

While we have reviewed some articles that describe OEE as an over rated metric, we believe that the proof of wisdom is in the result.  The semiconductor industry is exemplary in this regard.  It is clear that electronics industry “gets it”.

As we have mentioned in many of our previous posts, OEE should not be an isolated metric.  While it can be assessed and reviewed independently, it is important to understand the effect on the system and organization as a whole.

We appreciate your feedback.  Please feel free to leave us a comment or send us an e-mail with your suggestions to leanexecution@gmail.com

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

OEE for Batch Processes

Coke being pushed into a quenching car, Hanna ...
Image via Wikipedia

We recently received an e-mail regarding OEE calculations for batch processes and more specifically the effect on down stream equipment that is directly dependent (perhaps integrated) on the batch process.  While the inquiry was specifically related to the printing industry, batch processing is found throughout manufacturing. Our more recent experiences pertain to heat treating operations where parts are loaded into a stationary fixed-load oven as opposed to a continuous belt process.

Batch processing will inherently cause directly integrated downstream equipment (such as cooling, quenching, or coating processes) to be idle. In many cases it doesn’t make sense to measure the OEE of each co-dependent piece of equipment that are part of the same line or process. Unless there is a strong case otherwise, it may be better to de-integrate or de-couple subsequent downstream processes.

Batch processing presents a myriad of challenges for line balancing, batch sizes, and capacity management in general.  We presented two articles in April 2009 that addressed the topic of  where OEE should be measured.  Click here for Part I or Click  here for Part II.

Scheduling Concerns – Theory of Constraints

Ideally, we want to measure OEE at the bottleneck operation.  When we apply the Theory of Constraints to our production process, we can assure that the flow of material is optimized through the whole system.  The key of course is to make sure that we have correctly identified the bottleneck operation.  In many cases this is the batch process.

While we are often challenged to balance our production operations, the real goal is to create a schedule that can be driven by demand.  Rather than build excess inventories of parts that aren’t required, we want to be able to synchronize our operations to produce on demand and as required to keep the bottleneck operation running.  Build only what is necessary:  the right part, the right quantity, at the right time.

Through my own experience, I have realized the greatest successes using the Theory of Constraints to establish our material flows and production scheduling strategy for batch processes.  Although an in-depth discussion is beyond the scope of this article, I highly recommend reading the following books that convey the concepts and application through a well written and uniquely entertaining style:

  1. In his book “The Goal“, Dr. Eliyahu A. Goldratt presents a unique story of a troubled plant and the steps they took to turn the operation around.
  2. Another book titled “Velocity“, from the AGI-Goldratt Institute and Jeff Cox also demonstrates how the Theory of Constraints and Lean Six Sigma can work together to bring operations to all new level of performance, efficiency, and effectiveness.

I am fond of the “fable” based story line presented by these books as it is allows you to create an image of the operation in your own mind while maintaining an objective view.  The analogies and references used in these books also serve as excellent instruction aids that can be used when teaching your own teams how the Theory of Constraints work.  We can quickly realize that the companies presented in either of the above books are not much different from our own.  As such, we are quickly pulled into the story to see what happens and how the journey unfolds as the story unfolds.

Please leave your comments regarding this or other topics.  We appreciate your feedback.  Also, remember to get your free OEE spreadsheets.  See our free downloads page or click on the file you want from the “Orange” box file on the sidebar.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence AnalyticsVergence Analytics

Benchmarking OEE

Benchmarking Systems:

We have learned that an industry standard or definition for Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) has been adopted by the Semi Conductor Industry and also confirms our approach to calculating and using OEE and other related metrics.

The SEMI standards of interest are as follows:

  • SEMI E10:  Definition and Measurement of Equipment Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability.
  • SEMI E35:  Guide to Calculate Cost of Ownership Metrics.
  • SEMI E58:  Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability Data Collection.
  • SEMI E79:  Definition and Measurement of Equipment Productivity – OEE Metrics.
  • SEMI E116:  Equipment Performance Tracking.
  • SEMI E124:  Definition and Calculation of Overall Factory Efficiency and other Factory-Level Productivity Metrics.

It is important to continually learn and improve our understanding regarding the development and application of metrics used in industry.  It is often said that you can’t believe everything you read (especially – on the internet).  As such, we recommend researching these standards to determine their applicability for your business as well.

Benchmarking Processes:

Best practices and methods used within and outside of your specific industry may bring a fresh perspective into the definition and policies that are already be in place in your organization.  Just as processes are subject to continual improvement, so are the systems that control them.  Although many companies use benchmarking data to establish their own performance metrics, we strongly encourage benchmarking of best practices or methods – this is where the real learning begins.

World Class OEE is typically defined as 85% or better.  Additionally, to achieve this level of “World Class Peformance” the factors for Availability, Performance, and Quality must be at least 90%, 95%, and 99.5% respectively.  While this data may present your team with a challenge, it does little to inspire real action.

Understanding the policies and methods used to measure performance coupled with an awareness of current best practices to achieve the desired levels of  performance will certainly provide a foundation for innovation and improvement.  It is significant to note that today’s most efficient and successful companies have all achieved levels of performance above and beyond their competition by understanding and benchmarking their competitors best practices.  With this data, the same companies went on to develop innovative best practices to outperform them.

A Practical Example

Availablity is typically presented as the greatest opportunity for improvement.  This is even suggested by the “World Class” levels stated above.  Further investigation usually points us to setup / adjustment or change over as one of the primary improvement opportunities.  Many articles and books have been written on Single Minute Exchange of Dies and other Quick Tool Change strategy, so it is not our intent to present them here.  The point here is that industry has identified this specific topic as a significant opportunity and in turn has provided significant documentation and varied approaches to improve setup time.

In the case of improving die changes a variety of techniques are used including:

  • Quick Locator Pins
  • Pre-Staged Tools
  • Rolling Bolsters
  • Sub-Plates
  • Programmable Controllers
  • Standard Pass Heights
  • Standard Shut Heights
  • Quarter Turn Clamps
  • Hydraulic Clamps
  • Magnetic Bolsters
  • Pre-Staged Material
  • Dual Coil De-Reelers
  • Scheduling Sequences
  • Change Over Teams versus Individual Effort
  • Standardized Changeover Procedures

As change over time becomes less of a factor for determining what parts to run and for how long, we can strive reduced inventories and improved preventive maintenance activities.

Today’s Challenge

The manufacturing community has been devastated by the recent economic downturn.  We are challenged to bring out the best of what we have while continuing to strive for process excellence in all facets of our business.

Remember to get your free Excel Templates by visiting our FREE Downloads page.  We appreciate your feedback.  Please leave a comment an email to leanexecution@gmail.com or vergence.consultin@gmail.com

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

OEE Topics for 2009

We changed our theme!

Today was another day to do a little maintenance. We spent a little time revamping our look and feel. We hope you enjoy the changes and find our site a little easier to navigate.  We updated our Free Downloads page to present another easier and more direct venue to get your files instantly using Box.Net. If you’re already familiar with WordPress, you know how great this widget is. Downloads could never be faster or easier.

We also took some time to update some of our pages. We would suggest, however, that the best detailed content appears in the individual articles that we have posted.

Upcoming Topics for 2009

  1. Tracking OEE Improvements:  We have noticed an increase in the number of requests to discuss tracking OEE improvements.  We have been working on a few different approaches even for our own consulting practice and look forward to sharing some thoughts and ideas here.
  2. How OEE can improve your Cost of Non-Quality.  It’s more than yield.
  3. What OEE can do for your Inventory.  Improvements should be cascading to other areas of your operation – including the warehouse.
  4. Innovation – Defining your future with OEE
  5. OEE and Agile – Going beyond lean with OEE.
  6. Best Practices – OEE in real life, in real time

If you would like to suggest a topic for a future post, ask a question, or make a suggestion, please leave a comment or simply send an e-mail to LeanExecution@gmail.com or vergence.consulting@gmail.com.  We do appreciate your feedback.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence Business Associates

We respect your privacy, your information will not be shared, sold, or distributed to any third parties.  We will only use your e-mail to communicate with you at your request.  You will not be subject to any advertising or marketing campaigns.

Welcome to LeanExecution!

Welcome! If you are a first time visitor interested in getting started with Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), click here to access our very first post “OEE – Overall Equipment Effectiveness“.

We have presented many articles featuring OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness), Lean Thinking, and related topics.  Our latest posts appear immediately following this welcome message.  You can also use the sidebar widgets to select from our top posts or posts by category.

Free Downloads

All downloads mentioned in our articles and feature posts are available from the FREE Downloads page and from the orange “FREE Downloads” box on the sidebar.  You are free to use and modify these files as required for your application.  We trust that our free templates will serve their intended purpose and be of value to your operation.

Visit our EXCEL Page for immediate access to websites offering answers and solutions for a wide variety of questions and problems.  Click here to access the top ranking Excel Dashboards.  Convert your raw data into intelligent data to drive intelligent metrics that will help you to analyze and manage your business effectively.

Questions, Comments, Future Topics

Your comments and suggestions are appreciated.  Feel free to leave a comment or send us your feedback by e-mail to LeanExecution@gmail.com or VergenceAnalytics@gmail.com.  We respect your privacy and will not distribute, sell, or share your contact information to any third parties.  What you send to us stays with us.

Subscribe to our blog and receive notifications of our latest posts and updates.  Simply complete the e-mail subscription in the sidebar.  Thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence Analytics