Tag: Overall Equipment Effectiveness

Killer Metrics

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Managing performance on any scale requires some form of measurement.  These measurements are often summarized into a single result that is commonly referred to as a metric.  Many businesses use tools such as dashboards or scorecards to present a summary or combination of multiple metrics into a single report.

While these reports and charts can be impressive and are capable of presenting an overwhelming amount of data, we must keep in mind what we are measuring and why.  Too many businesses are focused on outcome metrics without realizing that the true opportunity for performance improvement can be found at the process level itself.

The ability to measure and manage performance at the process level against a target condition is the strategy that we use to strive for successful outcomes.  To put it simply, some metrics are too far removed from the process to be effective and as such cannot be translated into actionable terms to make a positive difference.

Overall Equipment Effectiveness or OEE is an excellent example of an outcome metric that expresses how effectively equipment is used over time as percentage.  To demonstrate the difference between outcome and process level metrics, let’s take a deeper look at OEE.  To be clear, OEE is an outcome metric.  At the plant level, OEE represents an aggregate result of how effectively all of the equipment in the plant was used to produce quality parts at rate over the effective operating time.  Breaking OEE down into the individual components of Availability, Performance, and Quality may help to improve our understanding of where improvements can be made, but still does not serve to provide a specific direction or focus.

At the process level, Overall Equipment Effectiveness is a more practical metric and can serve to improve the operation of a specific work cell where a specific part number is being manufactured.  Clearly, it is more meaningful to equate Availability, Performance, and Quality to specific process level measurements.  We can monitor and improve very specific process conditions in real time that have a direct impact on the resulting Overall Equipment Effectiveness.  A process operating below the standard rate or producing non-conforming products or can immediately be rectified to reverse a potentially negative result.

This is not to say that process level metrics supersede outcome metrics.  Rather, we need to understand the role that each of these metrics play in our quest to achieve excellence.  Outcome metrics complement process level metrics and serve to confirm that “We are making a difference.”  Indeed, it is welcome news to learn that process level improvements have translated into plant level improvements.  In fact, as is the case with OEE, the process level and outcome metrics can be synonymous with a well executed implementation strategy.

I recommend using Overall Equipment Effectiveness throughout the organization as both a process level and an outcome level metric.  The raw OEE data at the process level serves as a direct input to the higher level “outcome” metrics (shift, department, plant, company wide).  As such, the results can be directly correlated to specific products and / or processes if necessary to create specific actionable steps.

So, you may be asking, “What are Killer Metrics?”  Hint:  To Measure ALL is to Manage NONE.  Choose your metrics wisely.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence Analytics

OEE: The Means to an End – Differentiation Where It Matters Most

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Does your organization focus on results or the means to achieve them?  Do you know when you’re having a good day?  Are your processes improving?

The reality is that too many opportunities are missed by simply focusing on results alone.  As we have discussed in many of our posts on problem solving and continuous improvement, the actions you take now will determine the results you achieve today and in the future. Focus on the means of making the product and the results are sure to follow.

Does it not make sense to measure the progress of actions and events in real-time that will affect the end result? Would it not make more sense to monitor our processes similar to the way we use Statistical Process Control techniques to measure current quality levels?  Is it possible to establish certain “conditions” that are indicative of success or failure at prescribed intervals as opposed to waiting for the run to finish?

By way of analogy, consider a team competing in a championship race.  While the objective is to win the race, we can be certain that each lap is timed to the fraction of a second and each pit stop is scrutinized for opportunities to reduce time off the track.  We can also be sure that fine tuning of the process and other small corrections are being made as the race progresses.  If performed correctly and faster than the competition, the actions taken will ultimately lead to victory.

Similarly, does it not make sense to monitor OEE in realtime? If it is not possible or feasible to monitor OEE itself , is it possible to measure the components – Availability, Performance, and Quality – in real-time?  I would suggest that we can.

Performance metrics may include production and quality targets based on lapsed production time. If the targets are hit at the prescribed intervals, then the desired OEE should also be realized.  If certain targets are missed, an escalation process can be initiated to involve the appropriate levels of support to immediately and effectively resolve the concerns.

A higher reporting frequency or shorter time interval provides the opportunity to make smaller (minor) corrections in real-time and to capture relevant information for events that negatively affect OEE.

Improving OEE in real-time requires a skilled team that is capable of trouble shooting and solving problems in real-time. So, resolving concerns and making effective corrective actions in real-time is as important to improving OEE than the data collection process itself.

A lot of time, energy, and resources are expended to collect and analyze data. Unfortunately, when the result is finalized, the opportunity to change it is lost to history.  The absence of event-driven data collection and after the fact analysis leads to greater speculation regarding the events that “may have” occurred versus those events that actually did.

Clearly, an end of run pathology is more meaningful when the data supporting the run represents the events as they are recorded in real-time when they actually occurred.  This data affords a greater opportunity to dissect the events themselves and delve into a deeper analysis that may yield opportunities for long-term improvements.

Set yourself apart from the competition.  Focus on the process while it is running and make improvements in real-time.  The results will speak for themselves.

Your feedback matters

If you have any comments, questions, or topics you would like us to address, please feel free to leave your comment in the space below or email us at feedback@leanexecution.ca or feedback@versalytics.com.  We look forward to hearing from you and thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY lean

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Versalytics Analytics
 

OEE: Planned Downtime and Availability

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As a core metric, Overall Equipment Effectiveness or OEE has been adopted by many companies to improve operations and optimize the capacity of existing equipment.  Having completed several on site assessments over the past few months we have learned that almost all organizations are measuring performance and quality in real-time, however, the availability component of OEE is still a mystery and often misunderstood – specifically with regard to Set Up or Tool Changes.

We encourage you to review the detailed discussion of down time in our original posts “Calculating OEE – The Real OEE Formula With Examples” and “OEE, Down time, and TEEP” where we also present methods to calculate both OEE and TEEP.  The formula for Overall Equipment Effectiveness is simply stated as the product of three (3) elements:  Availability, Performance, and Quality.  Of these elements, availability presents the greatest opportunity for improvement.  This is certainly true for processes such as metal stamping, tube forming, and injection molding, to name a few, where tool changes are required to switch from one product or process to another.

Switch Time

Set up or change over time is defined as the amount of time required to change over the process from the last part produced to the first good part off the next process.  We have learned that confusion exists as to whether this is actually planned down time as it is an event that is known to occur and is absolutely required if we are going to make more than one product in a given machine.

Planned down time is not included in the Availability calculation.  As such, if change over time is considered as a planned event, the perceived availability would inherently improve as it would be excluded from the calculation.  Of course, the higher availability is just an illusion as the lost time was still incurred and the machine was not available to run production.

If we could change a process at the flip of a switch, set up time would be a non-issue and we could spend our time focusing on other improvement initiatives.  While some processes do require extensive change over time, there is always room for improvements.  This is best exemplified by the metal stamping industry where die changes literally went from Hours to Minutes.

To remain competitive and to increase the available capacity, many companies quickly adopted SMED (Single Minute Exchange of Dies) initiatives after recognizing that significant production capacity is being lost due to extensive change over times.  Overtime through extended shifts and capital for new equipment is also reduced as capacity utilization improves.

Significantly reduced inventories can also be realized as product change overs become less of a concern and also provide greater flexibility to accommodate changes in customer demand in real-time.  Significantly increased Inventory Turns will also be realized in conjunction with net available cash from operations.

Redefining Down Time

The return on investment for Quick Tool Change technologies is relatively short and the benefits are real and tangible as demonstrated through the metrics mentioned above.  Rather than attempt to categorize down time as either planned or unplanned, consider whether the activity being performed is impeding the normal production process or can be considered as an activity required for continuing production.

We prefer to classify down time as either direct or indirect.  Any down time such as Set Up, Material Changes, Equipment Breakdowns, Tooling Adjustments, or other activity that impedes production is considered DIRECT down time.  Indirect down time applies to events such as Preventive Maintenance, Company Meetings, or Scheduled IDLE Time.  These events are indeed PLANNED events where the machine or process is NOT scheduled to run.

Redefine the Objective

Set up or change over time is often the subject of much heated debate and tends to create more discussion than is necessary.  The reason for this is simple.  Corporate objectives are driven by metrics that measure performance to achieve a specific goal.

Unfortunately, in the latter case, the objectives are translated into personal performance concerns for those involved in the improvement process.  Rather than making real improvements, the tendency is to rationalize the current performance levels and to look for ways to revise the definition that creates the perception of poor performance. Since availability does not include planned down time, many attempts are made to exclude certain down time events, such as set up time, to create a better OEE result than was actually achieved.

Attempts to rationalize poor performance inhibits our ability to identify opportunities for improvement.  From a similar perspective, we should also be prudent with. and cognizant of, the time allotted for “planned” events.

It is for this reason that some companies have resorted to measuring TEEP based on a 24 hour day.  In many respects, TEEP eliminates all uncertainty with regard to availability since you are measured on the ability to produce a quality part at rate.  As such, our mission is simple – “To Safely Produce a Quality Part At Rate, Delivered On Time and In Full”.  Any activity that detracts from achieving or exceeding this mission is waste.

Remember to get your OEE spreadsheets at no charge from our Free Downloads Page or Free Downloads Box in the sidebar.  They can be easily and readily customized for your specific process or application.

Please feel free to send your comments, suggestions, or questions to Support@VergenceAnalytics.com

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence AnalyticsVergence Analytics

Differentiation Strategies and OEE (Part II): The Heart of the Matter

An article published in Industry Week magazine comprises part of our pursuit of differentiation strategies and OEE.  This will serve as the topical element of our post for today.

Enjoy the article, OEE:  The heart of the matter, and we’ll provide our thoughts and insights as well.  If the above links do not work, you can copy and paste the following link into your browser:

http://www.industryweek.com/articles/oee_the_heart_of_the_matter_18211.aspx

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Vergence Analytics

Lean, OEE, and How to beat the “Law of Diminishing Returns”

Are your lean initiatives falling prey to the Law of Diminishing Returns?  Waning returns may soon be followed by apathy as the “new” initiative gets old.  For those who have not studied economics or are not familiar with the term, it is defined by Wikepedia as follows:

The law states “that we will get less and less extra output when we add additional doses of an input while holding other inputs fixed. In other words, the marginal product of each unit of input will decline as the amount of that input increases holding all other inputs constant.

In simple terms, continued application of time and effort to improve a process will eventually yield reduced or smaller returns.  The low hanging fruit that once was easy to see and resolve has all but disappeared.  Some companies would claim that they have finally “arrived”.  We contend that these same companies have simply hit their first plateau.

Methods and Objectives

Is it inevitable that a process has been refined to the point where additional investment can no longer be justified financially?  The short answer is “Yes and No”.  As the Olympics are well under way, we are quick to observe the fractions of seconds that may be shaved from current world records.  If you’re going for Olympic Gold, you will need every advancement or enhancement that technology has to offer to gain the competitive edge.  These advances in technology are refinements for existing processes that are governed by strict rules.  Clearly, there are much faster ways to get from point A to point B.  However, the objective of the Olympics is to demonstrate how these feats can be accomplished through the physical skills and abilities of the athletes.

In business our objectives are defined differently.  We want to provide (and our customers expect) the highest quality products at the lowest cost delivered in the shortest amount of time.  How we do that is up to us.  Lean initiatives and tools such as overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) can help us to refine current processes but are they enough to stimulate the development of new products and processes?  Or, are they limited to simply help us to recognize when optimum levels have been achieved?

Radical change versus refinement

Objectives are used to determine and align the methods that are used to achieve a successful outcome.  This is certainly the case in the automotive industry as environmental concerns and availability of non-renewable resources, specifically oil and gas, continue to gain global attention and focus.  The objectives of our “transportation” systems are being redefined almost dynamically as new technologies are beginning to emerge.  At some point, the automotive industry leaders must have realized that continuing to refine existing technologies simply will not satisfy future expectations.  With this realization it is now inevitable that a radical powertrain technology change is required.  Hybrid vehicles continue to evolve and electric cars are not too far behind.

How to Beat the Law of Diminishing Returns

Overcoming the law of diminishing returns requires another look at the vision, goals, and objectives of the company and to develop a new, different, or fresh perspective on what it is you are trying to achieve.  The lean initiatives introduced by Toyota, Walmart, Southwest and many others were driven by the need to find a competitive edge.  They recognized that they couldn’t simply be a “me too” company to gain the recognition and successes they now enjoy.

The question you may want to ask yourself and your team is, “If we started from scratch today, is this the result we would be looking for?”  The answer should be a unanimous and resounding “NO”.  Get out your whiteboard, pens, paper, and start writing down what you would be doing differently.  In other words, it’s time to re-energize the team and refocus your goals and objectives.  Vision and mission statements are not tombstones for the living.  5S these documents and take the time to re-invigorate your team.

Turning a company around may require some new radical changes and we need to be mindful of the new upstarts with the latest and greatest technology.  They may have an edge that we have may just haven’t taken the time to consider.  We are not suggesting that you need to replace all the equipment in your plant in order to compete.  Proven technologies have their place in industry and the competitive pricing isn’t always about speed.  The question you may need to consider is, “Can our technology be used to produce different products that have been traditionally manufactured using other methods?”

While many companies pursue a growth strategy based on their current product offerings and derivatives, we would strongly suggest that manufacturers consider a growth strategy based on their process technology offerings.  What else can we make with process or machine XYZ?  We anticipate that manufacturing sectors will soon start to blend as manufacturers pursue products beyond the scope of their current industry applications.

Be the Leader

Leading companies create and define the environment where their products and services will thrive.  Apple’s “iProducts” have redefined how electronics are used in everyday life.  As these tools are developed and evolve, so too can the systems and processes used throughout manufacturing.  The collective human mind is forever considering the possibilities of the next generation of products or services.

There was a time when manned space flight and walking on the moon were considered unlikely probabilities.  Today we find ourselves discovering and considering galaxies beyond our own and we don’t give it a second thought.  How far can we go and how do we get there?  The answer to that question is …

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

Using TRIZ for Problem Solving – Introduction

Using TRIZ for Problem Solving – Introduction

A famous quote from Albert Einstein, “The problems that exist in the world today cannot be solved by the level of thinking that created them.“, applies to the discussion of problem solving and more so to the topic of TRIZ, The Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, developed by Genrich S. Altshuller.

TRIZ – Theory of Inventive Problem Solving

Genrich S. Altshuller developed TRIZ based on his search for a standard method to solve problems.  At the very basic level, once a problem is identified the objective is to determine whether a similar problem has already existed elsewhere.  If so, study the solution and determine whether it can be incorporated into the current solution being sought.  Taken one step further, consider the possibility that a different perspective of the problem may also present a unique inventive solution.

It does not seem too far fetched that the problem to be solved has occurred elsewhere in a completely different context.  The solution that is found may also be out of the context but the concept may lead to an innovative solution for the current problem at hand where one never before existed.

The application of TRIZ requires an open mind.  We often bring our “tool box” of experience to the table and draw on those tools and our wealth of knowledge to create a solution.  TRIZ is a tool that can be used to create completely new and unique solutions to a given problem.  This doesn’t mean that we need to abandon our current technology and know-how; it simply means that there may be other options where the current know-how and / or technology may not apply or it may be applied in a manner that is quite different than it is today.

Identify the Real Problem to be Solved

Any problem solving method can only be successful if the true root cause is identified.  Once found, a clear and concise problem statement must be formulated to assure that the solution developed and implemented indeed addresses the true root cause.

Searching for Solutions:

Once a problem has been identified, the next question is, “How do we solve it?”  There are a number of techniques that can be used such as brain storming and idea mapping, however, one seldomly used technique is TRIZ:  Theory of Inventive Problem Solving.

Every day we are challenged with a diverse range of problems from machine malfunctions to defective parts.  The very nature of any company’s operations requires an immediate fix to restore operations to “normal”.  Recognizing that a problem exists is not the same as understanding what the problem is and effectively solving the problem requires that we have identified the true root cause and not just the symptoms.

Many tools are readily available to even help us address these concerns or identify where opportunities exist to make improvements.  Unfortunately, these tools seldom provide the solution to the problem.  Too often we are trapped inside the box of current thinking, technologies, standards, methodologies, present knowledge, and even company policy.  Our own levels of thinking and plausible solutions are influenced and limited by our current understanding and knowledge of the problem as well as our own experiences.

The Basis for Using TRIZ to Solve Problems:

Technology

In some cases, product or part designs themselves may be constrained as engineers and designers work to generate a design tailored to a specific, known, technology.  Quality Function Deployment is one strategy that provides a platform to explore alternative design and process approaches before committing to a specific technology or process.

It is worth noting that, although product design is critical, processes and technologies used to manufacture the product itself are often overlooked and seldom are the process constraints and their affects ever considered.  There are many examples where numerous hours are wasted attempting to develop tools using traditional technologies to produce parts that conform to the wishes of engineers and designers.

How do we actually go about solving problems where the technology or the design present constraints that prevent success?  This is the basis for TRIZ:  We have clearly identified the problem to be solved, now we need a solution to resolve it.

Problem Classifications

Although problems may have varying degrees of difficulty, the solutions for them can only fall into one of two overly simplified categories:  Known or Unknown.  While this classification may appear simple on the surface, consider the unknown solution.  Is it truly unknown or is it only unknown to you.
  1. Known:  Surrogate process already proven and only requires adaptation for the current situtation.  The “problem solver” has an awareness or experience related to the solution.
  2. Unknown:  Typically, solutions are often limited by the scope of experience of the person or person(s) attempting to solve the problem.
    1. The problem solver is not aware of the solution’s existence (Personal)
    2. The solution is outside the problem solver’s scope of experience, training, or field of expertise, but may exist within the company (Company)
    3. The solution is not known within the company but is known within the industry (Industry)
    4. A solution can be realized although it does not presently exist (Outside Industry).
    5. Requires an inventive solution that goes beyond improving the existing condition and is not known to exist anywhere.
  3. Although a solution may be found or developed internally, it may not necessarily be ideal.  We recommend continual review of trade journals, going to trade shows, and networking not only with industry peers but outside your areas of expertise as well.

We will pursue the TRIZ methodology as both a learning and problem solving method.  Often times the solution to a problem requires a different perspective to achieve an effective resolution.

Applying TRIZ in the real world:

TRIZ can be used to develop solutions in a wide range of applications.  As Contingency Plans are developed, you may determine that a solution is required to address a problem or crisis that company has not yet experienced.  As we have discussed, the information or solution to the pending “crisis” may already exist elsewhere.  Similarly, improvements to Overall Equipment Efficiency may require solutions to be developed to address problems or opportunities that are inhibiting continued improvement. 

We will continue to pursue the application of TRIZ in the real world and present a more detailed case study.  

Note:  We would also recommend and encourage you to visit http://www.mazur.net/triz/ for an indepth presentation and detailed discussion of TRIZ.  This site provides greater detail and background that is presently beyond the application or scope of this series.

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

 

 

Time Studies with your BlackBerry

Performing a time study is relatively easy compared to only few years ago.  The technologies available today allow studies to be conducted quite readily.

Time Studies and OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness)

The Performance factor for OEE is based on the Ideal Cycle Time of the process.  For fixed rate processes, the Name-Plate rate may suffice but should still be confirmed.  For other processes such a labour intensive operations, a time study is the only way to determine the true or ideal cycle time.

When measuring the cycle time, we typically use “button to button” timing to mark a complete cycle.  It can be argued that an operator may lose time to retrieve or pack parts or move containers.  Including these events in the gross cycle time will hide these opportunities.  It is better to exclude any events that are not considered to be part of the actual production cycle.

When calculating the Performance factor for Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), the efficiency shortfalls will be noted by the less than 100% performance.  The reasons for this less than optimal level of peformance are attributed to the activities the operator is required to perform other than actually operating the machine or producing parts.

All operator activities and actions should be documented using a standardized operating procedure or standardized work methodology.  This will allow all activities to be captured as opposed to absorbed into the job function.

The BlackBerry Clock – Stopwatch

One of the tools we have used on the “fly” is the BlackBerry Clock’s Stopwatch function.  The stopwatch feature is very simple to use and provides lap time recording as well.

When performing time studies using a traditional stopwatch, being able to keep track of individual cycle times can be difficult.  With the stopwatch function, the history for each “lap” time is retained.  To determine the individual lap time or cycle time, we recommend dividing the total lapsed time by the number of completed cycles (or laps).

The individual lap times are subject to a certain degree of uncertainty or error as there will always be a lead or lag time associated with the pushing of the button on the BlackBerry to signal the completion of a cycle.  Although this margin of error may be relatively small, even with this level of technology, the human element is still a factor for consideration.

Once the time study is complete you can immediately send the results by forwarding them as an E-mail, PIN, or SMS.

The BlackBerry Camera – Video Camera

Another useful tool is the video camera.  Using video to record operations and processes allows for a detailed “step by step” analysis at any time.  This is particularly useful when establishing Standard Operating Procedures or Standardized Work.

Uploading videos and pictures to your computer is as easy as connecting the device to an available USB port.  In a matter of minutes, the data is ready to be used.

Video can also be used to analyze work methods, sequences, and also serves as a valuable problem solving tool.

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

We are not affiliated with Research In Motion (RIM).  The intent of this post is to simply demonstrate how the technology can be used in the context described and presented.

How to Solve Problems with Idea Maps

FreeMind 0.9.0 RC4 - Mind Map with User Icons
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Problem solving is a problem in itself for many companies and at times can be one of the most daunting tasks to undertake during the course of an otherwise regular work day.

For some, problems seldom occur while for others this may, unfortunately, be a daily activity.  Since problem solving is not usually part of the typical daily agenda of “routine” activities, our ability to find the time and solve them efficiently and effectively is compromised.

For many, just finding time seems to be one of the greatest challenges and perhaps a problem to be solved in itself.  Sweeping problems under the rug may be efficient but it is certainly not effective.  (So … broom is not the solution we’re proposing).

Using IDEA Mapping Techniques can help you solve problems effectively and efficiently.  IDEA Maps, Process Maps, and Mind Maps are variations on a theme.  We may use the terms interchangeably in the discussion that follows.

Background:

While there are several different approaches and “forms” that can be used to manage the overall problem solving process, the two most critical steps that will determine the effectiveness of the solution are:

  1. Define a Clear and Concise Problem Description / Statement
  2. Determine the Root Cause(s) of the problem defined by the Problem Statement.

While the first step seems relatively simple, the second step requires a little more effort.  There are at least two (2) root causes for most problems that stem from two simple questions:

  • Why Made?
  • Why Shipped?

These questions imply that defective product was made for a reason (process) and it was shipped to the customer undetected (system).  In other words, the customer is not protected from receipt of defective product.

The root cause analysis process forms the basis for all subsequent problem solving activities, including verification, interim and long term corrective actions.  A lot of time can be wasted simply because the real root causes were never identified.

Problem Solving Tools for Root Cause Analysis:

Many different tools can be deployed during the Root Cause Analysis process including Ishikawa Diagrams (Fishbone Diagrams), 5 Why (discussed in a previous post), Fault Tree Analysis, Q&A (Question Board), and Brain Storming to name just a few.

Mind Mapping or Process Mapping is a technique that provides an unconstrained approach to the thinking process for multiple input and contribution streams.  Maps can also be used to identify interactions or relationships to other elements.

Mind Mapping (Process Mapping)

The center of the map contains the problem statement.  We then surround the problem statement with potential inputs or contributors to the problem.  These statements in turn become the “center” of additional levels of inputs and contributors.  In some respects, the process map can be very similar to a Bloom Diagram and certainly supports the logic found with fishbone diagrams.

The   The draw back to “Mapping” is that most are usually developed on Whiteboards and not easily or readily translated into a software solution.

Software Solutions and Templates

While there are many spreadsheet based solutions, few provide an effective interface to support the use of mapping techniques.  Even most fishbone diagrams developed in Excel are quirky and awkward at best.

While we typically do not endorse specific software solutions, however, FREEMIND is one software that we consider to be among the best of available solutions and can be downloaded free of charge.  The download and installation process only requires a few minutes.

The developers of FREEMIND provide a clean, intuitive solution for creating and maintaining process or mind maps.  While other commercial packages are available, FreeMind is more than capable of handling most problem solving challenges and quite simply is time and money well saved.

The FreeMind homepage provides a better description of the software and it’s capabilities than we could provide here.  Our goal was to introduce “Mapping” as an effective and efficient tool that can be used in the problem solving process.

After spending some time with the software, you will quickly discover that there are many other opportunities where this software can serve you.  We have a mind map that we use to manage weekly and daily reports, another for key metrics, and yet another for our business structure.  The ability to use hyperlinks makes it an easy process to access external reports and resources .

The FreeMind main page provides an excellent overview and provides examples of their software in action.  This is definitely worth looking into and may just save some time for real problem solving.

We are presently using FreeMind version 0.9.0 RC 6.

Home: http://freemind.sourceforge.net/

Copyright 2000-2009 Joerg Mueller, Daniel Polansky, Christian Foltin, Dimitry Polivaev, and others.

Click here to see a sample process map to achieve delivery of 100% on time – in full:  Mapping with FreeMind.  We have also uploaded two documents (one of the original map and a word document showing a pictorial of the mind maps we created) into our Free Downloads box.  See the ORANGE box on the sidebar to get your copy.

If you have a copy of FreeMind, simply change the extension on our Delivery file from “.txt” to “.mm”  Of course, don’t type the quotes.  This is just a sample for example purposes only.  Feel free to edit or modify these files  in any manner you choose.

If you would like to learn more about IDEA Mapping we would encourage you to also read Idea Mapping – How to Access Your Hidden Brain Power, Learn Faster, Remember More, and Achieve Success in Business by author Jamie Nast (twitter:  @JamieNast) or you can visit the website at:  http://www.ideamappingsuccess.com/.

Click here to review or purchase your copy of Idea Mapping: How to Access Your Hidden Brain Power, Learn Faster, Remember More, and Achieve Success in Business

Until Next Time – STAY lean!

IDEA Mapping, Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc, Hoboken, New Jersey, Published simultaneously in Canada (ISBN-13:  978-0-471-78862-1, ISBN-10:  0-471-78862-7), 268 pages.  The book includes a companion CD-ROM featuring a 21 day trial for Mindjet MindManager 6.

Going DEEP with OEE

Does anyone actually look at their daily equipment availability? Instead of using TEEP that is typically based on calendarized availability, looking at the Daily Equipment Effectiveness Performance of your operation may provide some interesting insights.

Working overtime due to material or equipment availability occurs many times.  Unfortunately, we find that sometimes these very same machines are idle during the week.

A detailed explanation for calculating DEEP can be found in one of our earlier posts, “OEE, Downtime, and TEEP.”  Understanding machine utilization patterns may provide greater insight into the actual versus planned operating pattern of your process.

Just something to invoke some thoughts for your operation and to perhaps identify another opportunity to improve performance.

FREE Downloads

We are currently offering our Excel OEE Spreadsheet Templates and example files at no charge.  You can download our files from the ORANGE BOX on the sidebar titled “FREE DOWNLOADS” or click on the FREE Downloads Page.  These files can be used as is and can be easily modified to suit many different manufacturing processes.  There are no hidden files, formulas, or macros and no obligations for the services provided here.

Please forward your questions, comments, or suggestions to LeanExecution@gmail.com.  To request our services for a specific project, please send your inquiries to Vergence.Consulting@gmail.com.

We welcome your feedback and thank you for visiting.

Until Next Time – STAY Lean!

OEE in the Automotive Industry

The automotive industry appears to be rebounding at a faster rate than most (if not all) experts may have anticipated.  Many OEM’s and their suppliers are attempting to boost production to replenish inventories and support renewed demand for their products.  Reduced inventories throughout the supply chain are creating demand that is difficult to replenish at the rate required.  Short runs to bootstrap the “pipeline” are taking their toll on OEE rates but also provide the opportunity to identify new improvement initiatives.

General Motors and Toyota have both announced that increased demand for their product is anticipated for the next few months.  The increases are exciting for all involved, however, the ramp up to recovery may be more painful to achieve for some.  How is your company performing?  Those with fixed “cells” or processes may not be experiencing the same degree of frustration as those having flexible processes running multiple part numbers.

Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) typically suffers during these times due to the frequent changeovers and short volume runs.  If there was a time when you can’t change over or setup and run fast enough, this may be it.  Hang on and enjoy the ride.

Until Next Time – STAY lean!